Squaw Valley: Having some fun in the summertime!

Squaw Valley: Having some fun in the summertime!

By Tim Hauserman

In the last post, I talked about how Alpine Meadows is a quiet place to spend the summer.  Squaw Valley, separated from Alpine Meadows by a ridgeline, has a much more active vibe in the summer. In the village you will find a host of events and happenings like Blues Tuesdays, Earth Day and Wanderlust. But while it is easy to celebrate in the valley, you can also find plenty of ways to exercise while enjoying the Sierra sunshine. Just put on your bike shoes or your hiking boots and go do it.

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Take a ride

The eight mile journey from Squaw Valley to Tahoe City on the Truckee River bike trail is a smooth and pleasant roll. It begins with the ride along the edge of the grassy meadows of the valley. Once you are out of Squaw, the bike trail follows the Truckee River upstream to Tahoe City and The Commons beach where you will find Sunday night concerts, Wednesday night movies, and a relaxing view of Lake Tahoe anytime.

Another popular ride is from Squaw Valley to Truckee. From the intersection of Squaw Valley Road and Highway 89 it’s eight miles each way to the edge of Truckee along the river on a wide bike lane. To extend your journey, follow West River Street, to East River Street and the Legacy Trail, a wide bike trail which follows the Truckee River all the way to the outskirts of the Glenshire development.

Take a hike

In Squaw Valley, follow the Shirley Canyon blue paint marks as Squaw Creek tumbles over granite sluice boxes and tiny pools. The trail meanders, sometimes steeply, up smooth rock to eventually reach lovely Shirley Lake. From there you can retrace your steps, or make your way to the top of the Cable Car.

One of the Sierra’s classic hikes ends in Squaw Valley. It begins at the top of Donner Summit. For 15 miles the Pacific Crest Trail follows the top of ridge-lines, passes Anderson Peak and Tinker Knob, and drops into wildflower filled valleys, before ending with a long descent into Squaw Valley.

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